19th Century Bronze Plaque, The Legend of Gaius Mucius Scaevola

SKU: 415-92 Category:

$4,800.00

19th Century Bronze Plaque, The Legend of Gaius Mucius Scaevola

SKU: 415-92 Category:

$4,800.00

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Description

This large, impressive patinated bronze plaque has been cast in high relief and patinated to a rich brown color. The scene depicts the legend of Gaius Mucius Scaevola.

According to the lore, around 508 BC, Rome and Clusium (an Etruscan city) were embroiled in war.  A Roman youth named Gaius Mucius Cordus attempted to assassinate the Etruscan king, Lars Porsena. Instead, in a case of mistaken identity, Gaius accidentally killed a secretary of Porsena.  After being caught, Gaius told Porsena that he was just the first of 300 Romans ready to take down the king.  Gaius, in an incredible display of his bravery, thrust his right hand into a pit of fire. Porsena was so impressed with Gaius’ commitment that he allowed the youth to return to Rome.  Shortly after, Porsena withdrew his forces from Rome and sent peace offerings.

Upon his return to Rome, Gaius was given a large parcel of land on the right-hand banks of the Tiber River, which would in time become known as Mucia Prata or “Mucian Meadows”.  Gaius was also given the new surname “Scaevola”, which means left-handed in Italian. The Scaevola family would go on to become a prominent political family in ancient Rome, with a long line of magistrates and consuls from 215 BC – 75 AD.

The thick framework of this bronze plaque shows a course texture to the back edges, as though it had been embedded into a stone wall. This is a magnificent and unusual bronze plaque that will be a topic of conversation wherever it is placed.

Weight=114 lbs

CONDITION: Minor old cracks, rubs and surface grime.

INFORMATION
Age

1800's

Dimensions

H=24 3/8, L=31, D=4

REQUEST MORE INFORMATION

Description

This large, impressive patinated bronze plaque has been cast in high relief and patinated to a rich brown color. The scene depicts the legend of Gaius Mucius Scaevola.

According to the lore, around 508 BC, Rome and Clusium (an Etruscan city) were embroiled in war.  A Roman youth named Gaius Mucius Cordus attempted to assassinate the Etruscan king, Lars Porsena. Instead, in a case of mistaken identity, Gaius accidentally killed a secretary of Porsena.  After being caught, Gaius told Porsena that he was just the first of 300 Romans ready to take down the king.  Gaius, in an incredible display of his bravery, thrust his right hand into a pit of fire. Porsena was so impressed with Gaius’ commitment that he allowed the youth to return to Rome.  Shortly after, Porsena withdrew his forces from Rome and sent peace offerings.

Upon his return to Rome, Gaius was given a large parcel of land on the right-hand banks of the Tiber River, which would in time become known as Mucia Prata or “Mucian Meadows”.  Gaius was also given the new surname “Scaevola”, which means left-handed in Italian. The Scaevola family would go on to become a prominent political family in ancient Rome, with a long line of magistrates and consuls from 215 BC – 75 AD.

The thick framework of this bronze plaque shows a course texture to the back edges, as though it had been embedded into a stone wall. This is a magnificent and unusual bronze plaque that will be a topic of conversation wherever it is placed.

Weight=114 lbs

CONDITION: Minor old cracks, rubs and surface grime.

INFORMATION
Age

1800's

Dimensions

H=24 3/8, L=31, D=4

REQUEST MORE INFORMATION