Stripped Oak Monastery Table From France, Circa 1950’s

SKU: 420-10 Category: Tag:

$6,800.00

Stripped Oak Monastery Table From France, Circa 1950’s

SKU: 420-10 Category: Tag:

$6,800.00

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Description

This thick, carved oak monastery table is in the style of Louis XIV and was produced in France around the middle of the 1900’s.  It was originally built using large pieces of French oak, and then given a darker, more traditional stain.  At some point in its history, its been stripped and bleached, which allows it to be used with a variety of interiors.

Note that the table was carved en baluster, meaning that the legs are baluster shaped. This was a key component of early Louis XIV tables, before console legs became popular. Each side of the baluster has a carved-out geometric panel around the waist. The H-shaped stretcher is also indicative of this early period. By the end of Louis XIV, H-stretchers had lost favor to the new X-shaped supports. The stretcher runs through wide trestle feet and are held in place by large wooden dowels.

The monastery table is a cousin of the refectory table (usually narrower and very long).  Larger monasteries would have several refectory tables set up for the monks eat their meals, usually while a member of the monastery read passages from a pulpit. Toward the end of the Middle Ages, the refectory table could also be found in castles and other noble residences.  Today, the term monastery table is used to describe these larger, more primitive and robust antique tables that are carved “en massif” (from whole wood), rather than with veneers and inlays.

Our lovely French table has the sought after coloration of perfectly bleached oak. It’s thick beams, important stance, and soft worn edges will work in a variety of décor styles and would be an asset to any room.

CONDITION:  Good strong condition with minor age separations.  Traces of old wood worm.  Table can be disassembled easily by hand (no tools) for transportation purposes.

INFORMATION
Country Of Origin

France

In The Style Of

Louis XIV

Age

Circa 1950's

Dimensions

H - 29 1/2, W - 86, D - 35

REQUEST MORE INFORMATION

Description

This thick, carved oak monastery table is in the style of Louis XIV and was produced in France around the middle of the 1900’s.  It was originally built using large pieces of French oak, and then given a darker, more traditional stain.  At some point in its history, its been stripped and bleached, which allows it to be used with a variety of interiors.

Note that the table was carved en baluster, meaning that the legs are baluster shaped. This was a key component of early Louis XIV tables, before console legs became popular. Each side of the baluster has a carved-out geometric panel around the waist. The H-shaped stretcher is also indicative of this early period. By the end of Louis XIV, H-stretchers had lost favor to the new X-shaped supports. The stretcher runs through wide trestle feet and are held in place by large wooden dowels.

The monastery table is a cousin of the refectory table (usually narrower and very long).  Larger monasteries would have several refectory tables set up for the monks eat their meals, usually while a member of the monastery read passages from a pulpit. Toward the end of the Middle Ages, the refectory table could also be found in castles and other noble residences.  Today, the term monastery table is used to describe these larger, more primitive and robust antique tables that are carved “en massif” (from whole wood), rather than with veneers and inlays.

Our lovely French table has the sought after coloration of perfectly bleached oak. It’s thick beams, important stance, and soft worn edges will work in a variety of décor styles and would be an asset to any room.

CONDITION:  Good strong condition with minor age separations.  Traces of old wood worm.  Table can be disassembled easily by hand (no tools) for transportation purposes.

INFORMATION
Country Of Origin

France

In The Style Of

Louis XIV

Age

Circa 1950's

Dimensions

H - 29 1/2, W - 86, D - 35

REQUEST MORE INFORMATION