Early 20th Century Painting With Giltwood Frame, French Calvary Entering City

SKU: 320-9 Category: Tag:

Early 20th Century Painting With Giltwood Frame, French Calvary Entering City

SKU: 320-9 Category: Tag:

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Description

This wonderful oil painting by Raymond Desvarreux depicts the cavalry on horseback, entering a village in France during the Napoleonic Wars.

The focal point of the painting is the two mounted soldiers riding near a village center fountain. They are probably members of the Chasseurs à Cheval de la Garde Impériale, which were the light cavalry division of the Imperial Guard under Napoleon. The soldiers are identically dressed: wearing a red dolman with a sword on their hip and a red Phrygian cap on their head.

To the left of the center fountain, three more members of the calvary, this time dressed in all black and wearing bicorne hats, head towards the center of town. In front of them in the distance, a towering church steeple can be seen. To the right of the church is a large statue, as well as houses lining both sides of the street.

The giltwood frame complements the browns, creams and blues of the painting well. It especially makes the red uniforms pop, leading your eye directly towards the center of the canvas. The painting is signed on the bottom right “Raymond Desvarreux” and the frame has a cartouche on the bottom that says “R. Desvarreux”.

Raymond Desvarreux (1876 – 1961), was a French Painter and the son of James Desvarreux-Larpenteur, an American painter. Like his father he painted landscapes, horses and hunting scenes, however, became well known for his military paintings, exhibiting at the Salon de Paris. He was a member of the Society of Military Painters in 1913. Under the direction of Louis Dumoulin, he participated in the panorama of the Battle of Waterloo and was awarded a gold medal at the Salon in 1913. He was approved by the Army Museum in 1914 and appointed painter of the Ministry of War in February 1915.

 

CONDITION: Fleabites to gilt frame. No hooks for hanging.

INFORMATION
Country Of Origin

France

Dimensions

H - 23 3/4, W - 20 1/2, D - 2

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Description

This wonderful oil painting by Raymond Desvarreux depicts the cavalry on horseback, entering a village in France during the Napoleonic Wars.

The focal point of the painting is the two mounted soldiers riding near a village center fountain. They are probably members of the Chasseurs à Cheval de la Garde Impériale, which were the light cavalry division of the Imperial Guard under Napoleon. The soldiers are identically dressed: wearing a red dolman with a sword on their hip and a red Phrygian cap on their head.

To the left of the center fountain, three more members of the calvary, this time dressed in all black and wearing bicorne hats, head towards the center of town. In front of them in the distance, a towering church steeple can be seen. To the right of the church is a large statue, as well as houses lining both sides of the street.

The giltwood frame complements the browns, creams and blues of the painting well. It especially makes the red uniforms pop, leading your eye directly towards the center of the canvas. The painting is signed on the bottom right “Raymond Desvarreux” and the frame has a cartouche on the bottom that says “R. Desvarreux”.

Raymond Desvarreux (1876 – 1961), was a French Painter and the son of James Desvarreux-Larpenteur, an American painter. Like his father he painted landscapes, horses and hunting scenes, however, became well known for his military paintings, exhibiting at the Salon de Paris. He was a member of the Society of Military Painters in 1913. Under the direction of Louis Dumoulin, he participated in the panorama of the Battle of Waterloo and was awarded a gold medal at the Salon in 1913. He was approved by the Army Museum in 1914 and appointed painter of the Ministry of War in February 1915.

 

CONDITION: Fleabites to gilt frame. No hooks for hanging.

INFORMATION
Country Of Origin

France

Dimensions

H - 23 3/4, W - 20 1/2, D - 2

REQUEST MORE INFORMATION